PARRY'S POST

my posts are an accumulation of things that i am inspired by daily. enjoy.

Response to Stephen Carter-Novotni’s “Frozen Menagerie: Jeremy Johnson explores the scientific art of dissection and taxidermy”

This exhibit is meant to show that humans and animals are connected by similarities in our basic anatomy. Jeremy Johnson is interested in showing viewers the process of dissecting animals. The public dissections are displayed in his home most of the time a few times annually. He wants his audience to understand the anatomy of the creatures (deceased by natural causes). The shows, which go on for hours are meant to get the viewers to think of their own mortality. The other half of his work involves taxidermy. He puts the animals back together in poses either very stoic (typical of most taxidermy) or very animated as if frozen in time.

This interest in mortality and the composition of bodies (animal and human) started as a child. I think it’s really great that art can allow you to explore a strange interest and in this case teach the public about that interest. Despite the creep-factor in these shows, they do educate by way of instruction through Johnson’s voice. I think it’s important to stay open minded to subjects and practice you might normally gasp at in order to be a more informed person.  I can understand why Johnson believes these shows would cause viewers to access their own mortality and understand the basic composition of all creatures being so similar. Because we are so similar compositionally, it makes sense to appreciate that like us other people and animals have emotions that should be respected.  We will all die one day so might as well be nice and be treated nicely back while were still around. I think humans need to be shocked in order to change our views. We are naturally stubborn (some so much as to think they are much more special than most) and should be less so.

Article available at: http://www.citybeat.com/cincinnati/article-26471-frozen_menagerie.html 

History of the world seen in a stop-motion animation for Kalle Mattson’s Thick as Thieves video. Directed and animated by Kevin Parry, designed and animated by Carla Veldman and Andrew Wilson. 

Shary Boyle. Porcelain figures. 2005-2006.
Shary Boyle
Boyle is a brilliant multimedia Canadian artist. I am particularly fond of her porcelain figures and slide shows. She often combines fairy tales and mythological figures with violent and pornographic scenarios. Her work lies in between beautiful and disturbing which is what makes it so wonderful. I like to play within these normally separate spheres in my work from time to time, and definitely look up to Boyle who has perfected this in her own pieces. When first glancing at one her figurines in the Royal Ontario Museum for the first time I assumed it was a classical porcelain figurine a sophisticated woman probably stored in her drawing room back in the day similar to the paintings surrounding it….but then I took a closer look. It teases the viewer.I was stunned with the imagination of this woman. She makes the innocent bedtime stories we were used to as kids into a sick and twisted narratives I appreciate in a different way as an adult. Not only are the figures different in that sense but they appear more detailed than I have seen in any porcelain sculpture before. I really appreciate the amount of detail and I imagine painstaking hours of detail she puts into her work. I can’t even imagine how you would mimic small lace folds in one of her figure’s skirts. I would love to see her to illustrate an “inappropriate” children’s book. 
On that note look at: Douglas Coupland and Graham Roumieu’s Highly Innapropriate Tales for Young People

Shary Boyle. Porcelain figures. 2005-2006.

Shary Boyle

Boyle is a brilliant multimedia Canadian artist. I am particularly fond of her porcelain figures and slide shows. She often combines fairy tales and mythological figures with violent and pornographic scenarios. Her work lies in between beautiful and disturbing which is what makes it so wonderful. I like to play within these normally separate spheres in my work from time to time, and definitely look up to Boyle who has perfected this in her own pieces. When first glancing at one her figurines in the Royal Ontario Museum for the first time I assumed it was a classical porcelain figurine a sophisticated woman probably stored in her drawing room back in the day similar to the paintings surrounding it….but then I took a closer look. It teases the viewer.I was stunned with the imagination of this woman. She makes the innocent bedtime stories we were used to as kids into a sick and twisted narratives I appreciate in a different way as an adult. Not only are the figures different in that sense but they appear more detailed than I have seen in any porcelain sculpture before. I really appreciate the amount of detail and I imagine painstaking hours of detail she puts into her work. I can’t even imagine how you would mimic small lace folds in one of her figure’s skirts. I would love to see her to illustrate an “inappropriate” children’s book. 

On that note look at: Douglas Coupland and Graham Roumieu’s Highly Innapropriate Tales for Young People

Farhad Moshiri. Secret Garden. Oil, acrylic and swarovski crystals on canvas on board. 2009.
Farhad Moshiri is a mixed-media artist. Some works are made by squeezing paint through icing bags, some are sculptures writing happy messages with knives stabbed in the wall, and some mix paint and glitter (above). 
Secret Garden depicts a bear carrying a boy who is asleep through a dreamy forest. I particularly like this piece because it feels like a magical narrative that transports me back to my childhood or wonderful storybook full of adventures. I imagine this boy has fallen asleep and the bear has taken him to a magical world where he will meet other bejeweled creatures or experience something like Charlie in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory or the three children in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. 
Some of his other works are more focused on “pushing back on the prevailing notion of art as a luxury good and, equally, on art as a site of fantasy…all that glitters is not gold.” (Vitamin P2, 222). After reading this one might interpret the above work as the boy being led into or taken away from a materialistic controversial world. This message is more clear in other works…definitely worth checking out Sweet Dreams, Love Letter, Life is Beautiful, and others. 

Farhad Moshiri. Secret Garden. Oil, acrylic and swarovski crystals on canvas on board. 2009.

Farhad Moshiri is a mixed-media artist. Some works are made by squeezing paint through icing bags, some are sculptures writing happy messages with knives stabbed in the wall, and some mix paint and glitter (above). 

Secret Garden depicts a bear carrying a boy who is asleep through a dreamy forest. I particularly like this piece because it feels like a magical narrative that transports me back to my childhood or wonderful storybook full of adventures. I imagine this boy has fallen asleep and the bear has taken him to a magical world where he will meet other bejeweled creatures or experience something like Charlie in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory or the three children in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Some of his other works are more focused on “pushing back on the prevailing notion of art as a luxury good and, equally, on art as a site of fantasy…all that glitters is not gold.” (Vitamin P2, 222). After reading this one might interpret the above work as the boy being led into or taken away from a materialistic controversial world. This message is more clear in other works…definitely worth checking out Sweet Dreams, Love Letter, Life is Beautiful, and others. 

Benjamin Degen. Brevis. Oil on linen. 2010.

Benjamin Degen. Brevis. Oil on linen. 2010.

Harriet Mead. King Island Emu. Mixed media sculpture. 2012.

Harriet Mead. King Island Emu. Mixed media sculpture. 2012.

(Source: artnews.com)

Response to Robin Cembalest’s “In a Post-Audubon Era, Things Can Take a Nasty Tern” by Kristen Parry

The title of the short article plays on John James Audubon, the ornithologist best known for his book The Birds of American (1827-1839), which identifies many bird species, some of which are now extinct. “The Nasty Tern” comes from the title of a work by Ralph Steadman’s called Nasty Tern. Which depicts a violent or “nasty” extinct bird called the Tern. The article touches on people’s fascination with extinction; in this case focusing particularly on extinct birds. I think people’s fascination with extinct birds may stem from being familiar with stories of the Dodo bird and wanting to investigate further into the less known species now absent from daily life. Although extinction is sad to think about, especially when thinking of the future of many of our currently endangered species or eventually ourselves, we are fortunate to have documentation of the past. In Audubon’s book we can see beautiful illustrations close to what these birds would actually have looked like during the time their species was alive. Resources like this are useful to people interested in rediscovering the extinct species but also those interested in re-interpreting them through art, such as the many images of drawings created by various artists in the article. I believe it is in human nature to want to hold onto the past. I had my own moment of feeling this sense of loss and urge to rediscover something while I was at the Royal Ontario Museum weeks ago. I had not thought much about dinosaurs before other than thinking they were cool, but when I came across a section of skeletons for underwater dinosaurs I was stunned. I had never learned about the underwater creatures in elementary school while learning about the T-Rex, Triceratops and the other typical main attractions. I was looking at the actual bones of a Pilosaurus. I think I felt similarly but to a much less degree that I had discovered this creature. Now I have this urge to create prints or something to remember this creature (despite being a nasty one) and bring it back to life like others have with the birds through their art. We shall see where this goes, if anywhere…maybe Pilosaurus Christmas cards?

Article available at: http://www.artnews.com/2012/11/19/post-audubon-bird-art/

Response to Jose Roca’s “Prints, or Contemporary Art”

This article discusses the dilemmas a contemporary printmaker will face when trying to be taken seriously as not just a “printmaker”, but also as an artist. Printmaking seems to be an underappreciated form of making art. Roca believes the technique is addressed too much, which undervalues the actual content of the work, saying it must, “…be reclaimed from technique-as-content and be understood as content through technique.”. I think art should be judged less so on medium and more so on content and intricacy. Prints should be looked at the same way as other mediums because there are really fantastic prints just as there are really fantastic drawings, sculptures, etc., and of course the reverse. The process and amount of work put into making a print before actually making the multiples is completely underestimated.

Because we as printmakers aren’t appreciated as much as we might like we might limit then our own definition of ours as artists to the technical discipline of printmaking. I think this can definitely cause problems for an artist in any medium. We must remain open-minded in order to stay creative. By defining ourselves within one medium we may limit the possibilities that other mediums such as drawing, painting, sculpture etc. can offer us.  We should remain devoted to printmaking because it is such a marvelous method of making work but we should never limit ourselves to possibilities of making works better even if that involved letting the more classical or art historically appreciated forms be added to our skill set. Roca addresses the benefits that print offers such as “generosity through multiplication…to reach a wider audience”. I completely agree with this statement and it is partially why I have stuck with such a medium and is attracted to other works made in this way. Finding a print I really like is similar to winning a lottery. I say this because not only am I adding a beautiful work to my collection, but it is also at a reasonable cost.  I am able to appreciate art and own my own pieces without having to have a hefty sum like I would if I wanted to buy a painting by a mediocre artist. Of course we can view some of these high priced works in museums and galleries, but it is not the same as having it in your home and apart of your daily surroundings.  Considering the amount of work a lot of prints can take before producing multiples combined with how reasonable of a price you can often find them for if you look is exciting. Everybody should be able to own a piece of art that they really love. Art should be inclusive, not exclusive.

Article available at: http://www.philagrafika.org/pdf/WS/printsorcontemporaryart.pdf

Pilosaurus skeleton.

Pilosaurus skeleton.

Friday Night Live at The Royal Ontario Museum
This event has been going on every Friday evening from 7 p.m. until 12 a.m. since October 12th. The ROM opens up their doors to the public after normal opening hours. One might think it is just like going during the day but thats not the case. They keep the main floor as a dance floor with a DJ, two bars and some snack booths. Higher floors include a  Jazz Coffee Bar or Late night Cabaret Lounge, more bars and snacks. Highlights of my night were having oysters near the dinosaur skeletons and cupcakes by the gorgeous rocks and minerals. It’s definitely an experience at a museum I’ve never had before and I think its a smart way to get people into the museum that normally might not be interested as well. These fun experiences not typically associated with visits to the ROM (at least for me) make the art experience more enjoyable, rather than “No drinks near the art!” or “Do not take photos!” or “Shhhhh”. The last chance to go is this Friday, November 30th but I imagine this event will be brought back due to the positive feedback. Buy tickets online or at the ROM.

Friday Night Live at The Royal Ontario Museum

This event has been going on every Friday evening from 7 p.m. until 12 a.m. since October 12th. The ROM opens up their doors to the public after normal opening hours. One might think it is just like going during the day but thats not the case. They keep the main floor as a dance floor with a DJ, two bars and some snack booths. Higher floors include a  Jazz Coffee Bar or Late night Cabaret Lounge, more bars and snacks. Highlights of my night were having oysters near the dinosaur skeletons and cupcakes by the gorgeous rocks and minerals. It’s definitely an experience at a museum I’ve never had before and I think its a smart way to get people into the museum that normally might not be interested as well. These fun experiences not typically associated with visits to the ROM (at least for me) make the art experience more enjoyable, rather than “No drinks near the art!” or “Do not take photos!” or “Shhhhh”. The last chance to go is this Friday, November 30th but I imagine this event will be brought back due to the positive feedback. Buy tickets online or at the ROM.


Splice: At the Intersection of Art and Medicine at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga

Splice: At the Intersection of Art and Medicine at Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga



Kristen Parry. Biological series. Watercolour and silkscreen. 2012. 
This series was first inspired by illustrations in The Art of Instruction by Katrien Van der Shueren showcasing scientific anatomy of flowers. I found the shapes of the insides of some of the flowers to be more interesting than the flowers in their whole form. I decided to combine these shapes with the beetle shapes I had previously worked with in Bejewled Beetles. I enjoy combining the beautiful (flowers and watercolours) with the “creepy” (bugs…according to some people). This dichotomy is something that will always intrigue me because by combining subjects to create the unexpected is what keeps me interested in many artworks and allows me to come up with new works that hopefully haven’t been explored already. I experimented with watercolour backgrounds in full size works (5 by 8 in) and in my business cards, but have also made a 3-D cut-out version. I am considering continuing with this series by making a large scale installation of 3-D cut-outs with different papers and including colour. This is still to be decided. I have recently been really interested in working with reflective imagery and layering in a collage like manner to create objects growing out of other objects. These themes are also evident in my Untitled ink drawing also being worked on this year but to a larger extent. I will continue to work with these themes in more upcoming works as well. 

Kristen Parry. Biological series. Watercolour and silkscreen. 2012. 

This series was first inspired by illustrations in The Art of Instruction by Katrien Van der Shueren showcasing scientific anatomy of flowers. I found the shapes of the insides of some of the flowers to be more interesting than the flowers in their whole form. I decided to combine these shapes with the beetle shapes I had previously worked with in Bejewled Beetles. I enjoy combining the beautiful (flowers and watercolours) with the “creepy” (bugs…according to some people). This dichotomy is something that will always intrigue me because by combining subjects to create the unexpected is what keeps me interested in many artworks and allows me to come up with new works that hopefully haven’t been explored already. I experimented with watercolour backgrounds in full size works (5 by 8 in) and in my business cards, but have also made a 3-D cut-out version. I am considering continuing with this series by making a large scale installation of 3-D cut-outs with different papers and including colour. This is still to be decided. I have recently been really interested in working with reflective imagery and layering in a collage like manner to create objects growing out of other objects. These themes are also evident in my Untitled ink drawing also being worked on this year but to a larger extent. I will continue to work with these themes in more upcoming works as well. 

Kristen Parry. Biological series. Silkscreen. 2012.

Kristen Parry. Biological series. Silkscreen. 2012.